One of the greatest features of Fair Trade products is their bright, colorful and inspired designs that are sure to spark a conversation with someone. When pieces are unique or colorful, people are drawn to it and tend to want to know where it came from. This is when items from Jesus Economy can really shine because you have the opportunity to share with them all that fair trade item does.

Here's a few products from our Fair Trade Shop that'll be sure to start a conversation. 

Cross Body Bags from Guatemala in Emerald Green

Baskets from Rwanda: Teardrop Tri-Color

Belts from Guatemala: 47" with Horn Buckle

Earrings from Haiti: Mafi Pendant in Blue

 

Tote Bags from Haiti: Afrique

Baskets from Rwanda: Constellation in Tea and Bordeaux with Border

Pillows from Haiti: Canvas and Leather Nouveau

Table Napkin Sets from Guatemala: Berry Jubilee Striped

There's still a week left to Fair Trade Month, so grab your Fair Trade item and get ready to tell all your friends why it's a piece of hope. 

 

October is Fair Trade Month, and that means now is the perfect time to learn about fair trade. Whether you shop fair trade exclusively, or know nothing about it at all, this is the place to be. Here are 5 things to know about shopping fair trade from Jesus’ Economy.

1. Fair Trade Improves the Global Economy

Fair trade is a way of exchanging goods for fair compensation. This means that people who make products are paid the correct amount of money for the work they’ve completed. In many of the countries Jesus’ Economy has partners in, being paid justly isn’t a normal thing. But when people aren’t paid fairly for the work they’ve done, their whole family suffers. It becomes harder to pay for food, shelter, and education, and the cycle of poverty continues.

When artisans are able to sell their products fairly, their individual finances improve. When many people in a community experience improved personal economy, their community also sees an improvement. Money is no longer just changing hands within the community, it is now coming in on a larger scale and coming from other countries. And when communities grow economically, so does the world economy.

2. Fair Trade Helps Alleviate Poverty

Jesus’ Economy partners with cooperatives around the world that create products to sell internationally. These products are sold for the fair amount of money, and the artisans who’ve made the products are better able to support their families. With more money coming in, men and women can pay for food and shelter, and even for their children to go to school. When their children go to school, the future becomes brighter for everyone.

3. Fair Trade Teaches Us about Other Cultures

International fair trade products are a great way to experience culture from around the world. Many of the cooperatives we partner with incorporate traditional designs into their products to celebrate their heritage.

The scarves from Nepal, inspired by traditional nepalese fashion, are just one of many wonderful products that are beautiful, practical, and honor the country they come from.

All of the aprons from Guatemala have colors and patterns that incorporate traditional Mayan design, helping to inspire you while you cook. 

4. Fair Trade is Environmentally Friendly

The artisans we work with responsibly use sustainable materials from around their communities. 2nd Story Goods uses recycled aluminum to create pendants for jewelry, sweet grass to weave baskets, and locally sourced goat leather to cover journals. Many retail clothing and jewelry makers use chemical dyes and non-renewable materials, but these artisans are creating goods that love the earth and eliminate waste.

 

5. Fair Trade Brings People Together

There is a real connection to be made when you shop fair trade. When you wear a scarf from Haiti, you can pray for the hands that made it and know that your purchase is helping a family gain financial stability. When you carry a goat leather wallet, you know that it was made by people who are working hard to create hope for themselves.

And when you wear your fairly traded necklace or set a fairly traded trivet on your table, you can tell the story about where it’s from and why it matters.

This October, think about shopping fair trade. And with Christmas coming up, maybe you can get ahead on some gift buying!

This post was previously published under the title "5 Things to Know about Fair Trade." 

Down in the cerrado-covered lands of central Brazil, natural resources are being turned into art. Valquiria (pictured middle) and her fellow artists are producing amazing handwoven goods out of the renewable, local resource, golden grass.

Bring this bright, beautiful material into your home and wardrobe. Support entrepreneurship in this diverse country, filled with beauty and brokenness.

Use coupon code BRZ2018 to save 10% on all Brazilian made products through Oct 6th!

 

 Shop the Brazil Collection  

An often forgotten message of the gospel is that it empowers us to live free from the burdens of sin. You may be thinking: “but you don’t know what I’ve done, the mistakes I’ve made.” Let me tell you this, God used a murderer, a man named Saul whose name was changed to Paul, to lead the missions efforts of the early church. Do you think God can use you? Paul firmly believed, that despite even his ongoing struggles, that God would prevail. So when you sin, confess and repent. And aim to live a life free from sin.

You’re not alone in this: you can seek accountability, someone to regularly ask you how things are going, that you can be real and honest with. You can grow as a Christian in community. There is no shame, for we have all sinned and fallen short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23).

But it is in the denial of sin that we show that we are Jesus’ followers. First John 2:3–6 (NIV) reads:

“We know that we have come to know him if we keep his commands. Whoever says, ‘I know him,’ but does not do what he commands is a liar, and the truth is not in that person. But if anyone obeys his word, love for God is truly made complete in them. This is how we know we are in him: Whoever claims to live in him must live as Jesus did.”

So John tells us to live like Jesus did, that means resisting the pull of evil on our lives. On this point, the author of Hebrews says:

“For we do not have a high priest who is unable to empathize with our weaknesses, but we have one [Jesus] who has been tempted in every way, just as we are—yet he did not sin” (Hebrews 4:15).

Jesus was tempted, like us, as a human and prevailed. So know that he is there to listen, understanding of our weaknesses. He wants a better life for you but he is also gracious and loving.

But what are these commands that we should aim to keep? Usually we think of keeping commands as abstaining from something, what we don’t do. But John tells us that Jesus’ command is also about what we should do. In 1 John 2:7–11 (NIV), he says:

“Dear friends, I am not writing you a new command but an old one, which you have had since the beginning. This old command is the message you have heard. Yet I am writing you a new command; its truth is seen in him and in you, because the darkness is passing and the true light is already shining. Anyone who claims to be in the light but hates a brother or sister is still in the darkness. Anyone who loves their brother and sister lives in the light, and there is nothing in them to make them stumble. But anyone who hates a brother or sister is in the darkness and walks around in the darkness. They do not know where they are going, because the darkness has blinded them.”

John tells us that his new command is actually old. It is old in the sense that it has been around since Moses first wrote the Law. It is new in the sense that it is now understood in light of Jesus, as an integral part of what it means to follow God. This commandment is to love your “brother and sister;” this is how one “lives in the light.” This is also new in the sense that it is now understood as loving to the point that we are willing to lay down our lives for another person, as Jesus laid down his life for us. On this, Jesus says:

“A new command I give you:

Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another … Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends” (John 13:34–35; 15:13).

This is the fourth truth: Light is in the world, fighting the darkness, through the self-sacrificial actions of Jesus’ followers.

This is not the way people in our world live. We live in a every person for him or herself sort of world. At most, it’s every family for themselves.

But John calls us to look at the “whole world” as that which Jesus wishes to redeem (1 John 2:2). And we are to be advocates of this sort of self-sacrificial love. This is how darkness and hate loses, with light and love. This is the trajectory of the true story of the whole world that God is telling.

Because this is such a great contrast, John says in 1 John 2:15–17 (NIV):

“Do not love the world or anything in the world. If anyone loves the world, love for the Father is not in them. For everything in the world—the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life—comes not from the Father but from the world. The world and its desires pass away, but whoever does the will of God lives forever.”

John confirms that we should resist the desires “of the flesh:” pride, sex out of context of marriage, and many other things that could be added to this list. So discipline, as a Christian, is to be desired. This doesn’t mean that human nature is bad, but instead John is juxtaposing the way things are commonly done in the world with God’s ways. He is saying there is a truth to the light and darkness dualism. There is a real war here between what the Holy Spirit desires for our lives and the human realm, culture, pulling us in a different direction.

John reminds us that this is not what is eternal, but instead God and those who enter into relationship with Jesus will last forever. The battle is temporary.

And this is the fifth truth that is often forgotten in our dualistic, two powers metaphor: That there are not two powers in heaven, but one supreme power! That power is God! Satan and Jesus are not equals. Instead, Christ is victor and this is where we find eternal victory.

It is in light of this that John says in his poem in 1 John 2:12–14 (NIV):

“I am writing to you, dear children,

because your sins have been forgiven on account of his name.

I am writing to you, fathers,

because you know him who is from the beginning.

I am writing to you, young men,

because you have overcome the evil one.

I write to you, dear children,

because you know the Father.

I write to you, fathers,

because you know him who is from the beginning.

I write to you, young men,

because you are strong,

and the word of God lives in you,

and you have overcome the evil one.”

We have overcome the evil one, because there are not two powers. Hate and love may be at war today, but the love of Christ is victor! This is because there is only one power in heaven and that is God. Live love. Fight the power of hate with it. It is this way that we keep darkness at bay.

 

Get more free articles like this and other updates: Subscribe now. This long-form article is part of our weekly series, “Living for Jesus.”

It is the common thread through every epic story, through each narrative: There are two powers and they are at war. There is good and evil, love and hate, darkness and light.

Think of Star Wars: the dark side and the light side. Think of Lord of the Rings: Sauron versus the Fellowship of the Ring. The same theme is in ancient literature throughout the ancient Near East and Jewish world, such as the Dead Sea Scrolls’ community who envisioned themselves as the “sons of light” who would one day fight Rome, whom they viewed as the darkness. But in this dualism, where everything is polarized, there are a few truths missing.

To see what I mean, let’s venture into 1 John, which uses similar light and dark language, but in a different way.

In 1 John 1:1–4, John tells us that God has come in flesh as Jesus. John says that he is an eyewitness to Jesus’ ministry; this makes the letter we’re reading deeply personal.

John then uses darkness and light language, saying that he has heard from Jesus that “God is light, and in him is no darkness at all” (1 John 1:5). Thus anyone who claims to know Jesus must walk in this light, confessing his or her shortcomings. Living in the truth that we are sinful and flawed, and completely dependent on Christ, is key to our relationship with God and with other people (1 John 1:6-10). There is wrong in all of us.

This is the first truth that should confront the dualistic, two powers myth that is so common in culture: light and darkness are not polarized in us humans, but instead we each have both good and evil in us. We are incapable on our own of living in the light without Jesus.

This is where 1 John 2:1-2 (NIV) comes in [the beginning of our focus passage for today]:

My dear children, I write this to you so that you will not sin. But if anybody does sin, we have an advocate with the Father—Jesus Christ, the Righteous One. He is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for ours but also for the sins of the whole world.

This is the second truth: it is Jesus’ “atoning sacrifice for our sins” that makes us right before God. And the invitation to enter into relationship with God, because of what Jesus has done, is available to everyone, to “the whole world.”

But this isn’t a grace to be taken for granted; it is God’s wish that we “will not sin.”

This is the third truth that should confront the common dualistic, two powers myth: God has come into the world to bring light, in Jesus, and that light can change our very lives. It frees us from sin. God wants you to be free from sin.

 

This is the end of part 1. Part 2 will be published tomorrow, so tune in for the rest.

 

Get more free articles like this and other updates: Subscribe now. This long-form article is part of our weekly series, “Living for Jesus.”

You might be in denial, holding on to the last bits of summer sunshine, but fall is quickly approaching, and with it, the craziness of a new season. Fall is full of great things—from pumpkin patches to corn mazes to holidays—but it’s important to slow down and mindfully approach the season. Here are a few things you can do to live like Jesus this fall.

1. Help a neighbor with yard work

As the weather gets cooler and leaves start to fall, everyone with a yard is going to have some extra work to do. Fall yard work can take a lot of time and energy, and not everyone has the ability to get their yard ready for winter. Let’s step in and help out our neighbors. Doing so is kind, creates an opportunity for fellowship, and reminds us to take a deep breath and look outside of ourselves.

 2. Organize a clothing and food drive to benefit others

Many people don’t have proper clothing and food to keep them warm this winter, and if you have the time and know-how, maybe think about starting a drive to donate these necessary items to people who need them. Ask a local shelter what their biggest needs are and see how you can help. Taking care of the people in our cities is what Jesus did and what he asked us to do.

 3. Take a retreat from technology

As the fall comes in, life tends to get busy, and it’s easy to get swept up in everything new thrown at us. At this time, it’s especially important to stay focused on the things that matter, and this might mean taking a break from some of the things that don’t matter so much. Even Jesus rested and took breaks, taking time to refocus on God. We honor him when we do the same.

 4. Join a Bible study

With that autumn busyness, it’s easy to put our Bible reading on the backburner. Joining a Bible study is a great way to be held accountable to our commitment to the word of God and to being in fellowship with other believers.

5. Keep a prayer journal

God is constantly moving in our lives, and it’s important to be aware of these things. This fall, keep a prayer journal of praises and petitions and bring the focus back to the Lord. We might find ourselves more aware of how he is working in our lives and in the lives of those around us.

Living like Jesus is how we can share the gospel everywhere we go. This fall, we encourage you to live out your faith courageously.

 

Sometimes all you need is just a little bling; a little bling to brighten your day when you glance at it, no matter what kind of day you're having. 

These products from the Fair Trade Shop have just the right amount of bling combined with the power of economic justice. When you look at the piece, not only will the shine brighten your day, it will brighten your smile because it will remind you of the income you helped provide for a family. All with one simple purchase. 

Golden Grass Products

The beautiful capim dourado or 'golden grass' used in our Brazilian woven grass collections can be found growing in the Tocantins region of Brazil, where our artist partners, Raimunda and Moracir, live. It is a protected resource, and its raw grasses cannot be exported. Only the finished grass products of the indigenous peoples of Brazil can be brought into your home--making these items unique and valuable. It is durable, flexible and lightweight, making it perfect for jewelry and basket making. 

EARRINGS FROM BRAZIL: GOLDEN GRASS UNITY PENDANT (SMALL)

BRACELETS FROM BRAZIL: SEGMENTO GOLDEN GRASS

EARRINGS FROM BRAZIL: SOLTA GOLDEN GRASS PENDANTS

BRACELETS FROM BRAZIL: SOLTA GOLDEN GRASS BANGLE IN YELLOW


NECKLACES FROM BRAZIL: SWIRLING COILS GOLDEN GRASS

TRIVETS FROM BRAZIL: PADRÃO GOLDEN GRASS

BASKETS FROM BRAZIL: GOLDEN GRASS CESTA TRANÇITA

Find so many more golden grass products from Brazil in our Fair Trade Shop, plus even more products that, depending on your style, might just be your kind of bling to brighten your day.

Being able to read and write is a privilege many of us don’t understand. Literacy creates opportunities, spreads information, and brings people together. This is true, yet an estimated 781 million adults around the world don’t have the resources or ability to read, and we need to talk about that. 

Having access to literature and literacy training should be a basic right for all people. As we work toward equality, we should remember that every person on earth deserves the chance to read and write because of the hope that comes with literacy.

The Gospel is For Everyone 

This isn’t a new notion or a new struggle.

These ideas—of opportunity, information, and fellowship—were at the heart of the Protestant Reformation 500 years ago. Martin Luther and other reformers believed that everyone deserved the chance to hear and understand the gospel.

Salvation is not only for those with the highest education or for those who live in the most privileged communities. Salvation is an offer for everyone, and fighting for literacy means continuing the fight of the Reformation—the fight to make the gospel accessible because we know that “God shows no partiality” (Romans 2:11 ESV).

It is possible to hear, understand, and surrender to the gospel without being able to read, but having the ability to study the world of your own volition is so important. Faith rests on the ability to hear what God is saying and meditate on his truth. Paul reminds us of this and says, “So faith comes from hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ” (Romans 10:17 ESV).

Literacy is About Equality and Opportunity

On International Literacy Day, it is important for us to remember the value of literacy, both to personal and to spiritual development. Literacy brings people to knowledge of the gospel, but it also provides opportunities for people to fight against poverty. Communication is at the core of many jobs, and knowing how to read and write properly is important. Furthermore, literacy opens up a world of art that enhances life on earth.

Living for Jesus means working to eradicate poverty. Living for Jesus means spreading the gospel. Living for Jesus means advocating for equality in all ways, including the right to literacy. We do these things because of God’s grace working in us, because we love like he loves.

“But if anyone has the world's goods and sees his brother in need, yet closes his heart against him, how does God's love abide in him?” (1 John 3:17 ESV) 

What Can We Do?

You can be an advocate in your own way—by donating to a literacy organization, offering your time to after school programs that teach reading and writing, or even starting your own project.

Here at Jesus’ Economy, we are funding church planting in Bihar, India. Each church plant we fund supports a local Bihar pastor in building and nurturing several home churches around his community. These pastors are hosting Bible studies, giving literacy training, and spreading the gospel throughout their villages. Thousands of people in Bihar are hearing the gospel and are learning to read it for the first time.

There are so many ways to get involved, but no matter what you do, remember that literacy is so much bigger than reading and writing. It’s an issue of equality, it’s an issue of access to the gospel, and it’s an issue that matters to God.

“Learn to do good; seek justice, correct oppression; bring justice to the fatherless, plead the widow’s cause” (Isaiah 1:17 ESV).

Literacy can change the world and give people hope, and that’s what we’re about here.

 

Get more free articles like this and other updates: Subscribe now. This long-form article is part of our weekly series, “Living for Jesus.”

Beleaf it or not, it's already time to get ready for fall, and we have just what you need. From notebooks and book bags for classes to scarves and autumn jewelry to new kitchen towels to freshen up your home, we have the products to set you up for fall. Here are a few of our favorites, but check out the Fair Trade Shop for more wonderfall options.

 

You hear from us often, but we also want to hear from YOU.

We want to know how you feel about the products you’ve purchased from the Fair Trade Shop. We want to know if your purchases are working out well for you, or if you’re having issues. So leave a review and let us know! 

Reviews are also helpful in letting other shoppers know what they’re looking at. Having the product in your hands is different then seeing a photo on a screen, so when you share your input on a product, you’re helping positively grow the experience of shopping at Jesus’ Economy for other buyers.

 

How to Leave a Review

 

1. Scroll to the bottom of the page for the product you want to review

2. Click "Write a review" and tell us what you think!

 

Feedback is a helpful resource for us, and the more you tell us, the more we know how to help you find what you need. We care about what YOU think, so let us know!

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