When we think about God’s plans in the world, we tend to think big. We have grandiose visions of what God could do. And while God’s plans certainly are big, it’s in the small things that he often does his work.

The end of Paul’s letter to Titus, his young apprentice, is a beautiful illustration of how God works in the small things, like friendship. Titus is on Crete; he is there to appoint leaders and help organize Christian communities. Paul, realizing that this is a temporary appointment that would ultimately mean Titus’ departure, says the following:

“As soon as I send Artemas or Tychicus to you, do your best to come to me at Nicopolis, because I have decided to winter there. Do everything you can to help Zenas the lawyer and Apollos on their way and see that they have everything they need. Our people must learn to devote themselves to doing what is good, in order to provide for urgent needs and not live unproductive lives. Everyone with me sends you greetings. Greet those who love us in the faith. Grace be with you all” (Titus 3:12–15 NIV).

Here we see a glimpse of Paul the apostle, not as the lone ranger we so often envision, but as a member of a larger ministry team. It is among friends that Paul goes about his mission, and we should do the same.

By observing the historical details of Titus 3:12–15, we can learn five things about Christian leadership. Each principle points back to God working in the small things, especially among friends who go about God's work together.

1. Local Leaders Should Always Be Empowered

We should emulate Paul’s view that communities often do not need outsiders long term; the locals are empowered for mission through Titus and then he is instructed to leave (Titus 1:5–9). Following Titus' departure, other Christian leaders (with different skill sets) will come alongside the local leaders to accomplish God's mission.

2. Different Phases of Ministry Require Leaders with Different Skills

In Titus’ place will be Artemas and Tychicus. We don’t know much about Artemas: this is the only mention of him. But Tychicus is mentioned multiple times in Paul’s letters. He was from Asia Minor (modern Turkey) and was part of Paul’s third missionary journey (Acts 20:4). Tychicus is often depicted in a messenger role, as someone who would bring Paul’s words to a Christian community; he does this for the Christians at Ephesus (Ephesians 6:21; 2 Timothy 4:12), Colossae (Col 4:7), and Crete (Titus 3:12).

3. Unforeseen Problems Can Be Used for Great Good

It appears that Paul plans for Titus to meet him in Nicopolis in Achaia near Corinth. These plans would ultimately be interrupted by Paul’s imprisonment in Rome, which was his second imprisonment. But God would use these circumstances for good, as Paul would write 2 Timothy from that imprisonment.

4. Full-Time Ministry is Only One Type of Ministry

Paul’s friendships were not just people in full-time ministry. Many of his ministry colleagues were craftsmen or had other trades. We see this in his note that Titus should “help Zenas the lawyer and Apollos on their way.” While we don’t know anything else about Zenas from the New Testament, church tradition holds that he would go on to be the bishop of Diospolis (called Lydda in the New Testament).

But Apollos we know quite a bit about: there is an account in Acts 18:24–28, where Paul’s craftsmen colleagues and husband-and-wife team Priscilla and Aquila explain to Apollos about the baptism of Jesus. Up to this point, he only knew about the baptism of John. Apollos then became one of the first Christian apologists, arguing publicly with Jewish leaders who disputed the gospel of Jesus and sought to persecute Christians. It was his knowledge of the Hebrew Scriptures that made Apollos such a strong speaker.

5. All Christians Can Contribute to Jesus' Ministry

Ultimately, Paul saw all of these friendships—with each person having their own unique skills—as contributing to the work of the gospel. His goal for Titus and these other leaders is simple: “Our people must learn to devote themselves to doing what is good, in order to provide for urgent needs and not live unproductive lives” (Titus 3:14 NIV).

Friendship is Where Gospel Work Begins

The gospel for Paul is a gospel of social action. And this action emerged out of friendships; it emerges out of authentic relationships. Paul demonstrates this again when he says, “Everyone with me sends you greetings. Greet those who love us in the faith. Grace be with you all” (Titus 3:15 NIV). This is a network of Christians doing good for Jesus.

When was the last time you stepped back to look at your friendships and ask God, how can these relationships be used for the good of my community? How can my friendships do good for your kingdom? This isn’t to say that we treat friendship in a utilitarian fashion, as something to be used for another purpose. Instead, it is that we understand that friendships have multiple purposes: they are there for the relationship and for the blessings that come from that, but they are also there for God’s grand working in the world.

In the simple and normal parts of life, we find a God who is active, using our friendships for the good of our communities and world.

This article is part of our series, "How to Authentically Live as a Christian: Paul's Letter to Titus."


Enjoy this article? Check out my new book, Jesus' Economy: A Biblical View of Poverty, the Currency of Love, and a Pattern for Lasting Change. With simple, everyday choices you can make the world a better place. Learn how to live Jesus' economy, the currency of love.

In the village of Jubilee, Haiti, the co-founder of 2nd Story Goods met Joseu (pictured here with his wife, Emanuella). He was making aluminum pots out of forms laid into the dusty ground. Into the side of each pot he was inscribing the words "I love Jesus," proclaiming the courage Jesus gives him.

Taking his story to heart, 2nd Story Goods asked Joseu to create aluminum products that could be sold on the global market. He readily accepted, and thus, the hand-hammered aluminum products were born.

The Stunning Jewelry Lovingly Hammered by Joseu

 

2nd Story Goods is a non-profit partner of Jesus’ Economy that co-labors with Haitian men and women to create wonderful products and revitalize their community. The artisans trained by 2nd Story Goods now have sustainable incomes and are making strides to break the cyclical poverty many were born into.

It is the vision of 2nd Story Goods to help people move from poverty to abundance through education, creativity, and practical life experiences.

Friends, 

As we look back on the last six months of Jesus' Economy, we have a lot to celebrate! God is doing great things through our community. We are blessed to be a part of his work in Bihar, India and around the world. Our partnerships with fair trade artists in developing communities have strengthened as our online fair trade store continues to grow. Thank you for partnering with us in this great effort to reach thousands with the gospel, with economic opportunity, and with the meeting of basic needs. 

We are well on our way to meeting our budget for the year in most areas. In others, we need a little help. 

For quick reference, it costs around $10,000 per year to run the administrative side of Jesus' Economy. Look at the table below to see what expenses factor into that number. On average, we grant $12,000 every year to our Renew Bihar, India Project. That grant covers the annual salaries of our four church planting partners and the cost of one or more water wells. We are also currently raising support to launch an empowering women job training program in Bihar

Jesus' Economy 2019 Budget

Note: Jesus' Economy invests all profit from our fair trade store back into the operations of Jesus' Economy, so we can create more jobs and fuel the movement. Read about our reinvestment strategy

As we continue in 2019, we ask that you prayerfully consider helping us meeting our fiscal goals. If you have any questions, please reach out to us at info@jesuseconomy.org or call 1-855-355-3266.

What is it like at your home when you have people over for dinner? Jesus suggests that our answer to this question tells us a great deal about our spirituality. Our answer to this question gets to the root of another question: Are we really loving our local and global neighbor? In what ways have we thought of ourselves as righteous, while ignoring the hurting? Have we truly counted the cost of being Jesus' disciples? Are we willing to give up our social status for the sake of those who have less than us? These are the questions behind Christian leadership.

In this sermon, I focus on Luke 14 and Matthew 22:2–14, where Jesus tells us to "count the cost" of being a disciple. I also look at the full meaning of the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25–37). In the process, I tell a series of personal stories, including how I nearly died as a child, overcame a severe speech impediment, and then sold my home to follow Jesus. Each time, God led me to count the cost and determine the worth of being a disciple. But the journey of being Jesus' disciple is still an ongoing process for me, as I am sure it is for you.

I delivered this sermon at ACTS Seminaries' Chapel (Trinity Western University) to a group of Christian leaders on May 8, 2016.

Subscribe now to the Jesus' Economy Podcast on iTunes, Spotify, or SoundCloud.

Give for the Sake of the Hurting

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In Northeast India, Jesus’ Economy sponsored church planter, Santhosh, is sharing the love of Jesus with people who have never heard of Jesus before. And his ministry is marked by miracles. This is the story of Myra’s miracle.

Myra is a 30-year-old woman from a middle-class farming family in Bihar, India. After experiencing a series of health difficulties, Myra found out that she had severe issues in her uterus. This was causing consistent, heavy bleeding for four months. Her husband took her to the local doctor and then to several more doctors, but everyone told them the same thing: there was no cure. She and her husband began feeling helpless, like there was no hope.

But then Santhosh visited the village where Myra and her husband live. Myra decided to tell Santhosh about her health issues and how no doctors had been able to help her. Santhosh told her the story of healing from Luke 8:43–48. He began, “There was once a woman who had been bleeding for 12 years. She was so desperate for healing, and so full of faith, that she reached out to Jesus and touched the edge of his garment. The woman believed that if she could just touch the hem of his garment that she would be healed. And she was healed. Jesus healed her, declaring that her faith had made her well.”

Hearing that story made Myra want to know more. She invited Santhosh to share the gospel with her and her husband. After hearing the gospel, they decided to believe in Jesus and started attending church. Shortly thereafter, Myra was healed of her bleeding.

Now that she’s physically healthy, Myra and her husband stay actively involved in their church and help spread the good news of Jesus.

Because of Santhosh’s ministering efforts, not only did a young woman and her husband experience spiritual healing, but she also experienced physical healing. She got to witness firsthand what the power of prayer can do. And now so have we. Please continue to pray with us for Santhosh and his church planting efforts. And if you can, donate to church planting, so Santhosh can continue this vital work.

There is nothing straightforward about ministry. As soon as people get involved, things get messy. It’s not as if the earliest Christians were exempt from this reality. Like us, the early Christians had their own baggage, their own cultural norms, and their own problems. How are we to go about having a healthy ministry environment when so many of us have so many issues?

How are we to discern between what our culture tells us is best for our community and God’s vision for community? Titus 3:8–11 can be understood as a framework for a ministry built on healthy relationships.

How Do We Create a Relationally Healthy Ministry?

In recent years, there has been a major push to have emotionally healthy ministry environments, and I heartily agree (e.g., Pete Scazzero's push for Emotionally Healthy Discipleship). But long before the modern popularity of emotionally healthy ministry, Paul wrote to his young apprentice Titus about similar issues.

The letter to Titus is written to the churches on Crete. Paul had left Titus there to appoint new leaders and guide the fledgling Christian communities for a season. As we read the letter to Titus, it becomes apparent that this is no easy task. These people have some serious issues—and don’t we all? In Titus 3:8–11, Paul says:

“This is a trustworthy saying. And I want you to stress these things, so that those who have trusted in God may be careful to devote themselves to doing what is good. These things are excellent and profitable for everyone. But avoid foolish controversies and genealogies and arguments and quarrels about the law, because these are unprofitable and useless. Warn a divisive person once, and then warn them a second time. After that, have nothing to do with them. You may be sure that such people are warped and sinful; they are self-condemned” (Titus 3:8–11 NIV).

“This is a trustworthy saying,” says Paul. This is a common phrase or formula in Paul’s letters to Timothy and Titus (occurring five times). It could be Paul’s way of demarcating a quotation or simply an affirmation that what he is saying is true (i.e., a form of rhetoric). It could even be that the formula is early liturgy (e.g., the reader could say “This saying is trustworthy,” and the congregation could respond, “This saying is trustworthy indeed”).

The idea of liturgy is the thread of thought I want to follow; not because I’m completely sold that the formula “the saying is trustworthy” was indeed early Christian liturgy, but because I think it leads to a practical application. Following this train of thought, I think we see in Titus 3:8–11 four principles for relationally healthy ministry.

1. Create a “Counterliturgy” to Culture

The first step in creating an emotionally healthy ministry environment is to live a different liturgy than our culture—to immerse ourselves in a different narrative, story, or rhythm of life. James K. A. Smith has called this, a “counterliturgy” (You Are What You Love, pp. 58, 125).

Our culture’s liturgy is high drama. It’s full of reality shows of people arguing and backstabbing; dramas in hospitals, courtrooms, and the white house; and violence, everywhere. There is violence in words and actions. This is the liturgy, or rhythm, present on our TVs. But what is God’s liturgy, his ultimate rhythm for our lives?

Smith observes that, “If our loves can be disordered by secular liturgies, it’s also true that our loves need to be reordered (recalibrated) by counterliturgies—embodied, communal practices that are ‘loaded’ with the gospel and indexed to God and his kingdom” (You Are What You Love, pp. 57–58). How can we “index” our lives to God’s kingdom, to his ways? How can we “load” our lives with the gospel? What does it look for our ministries to be “reordered (recalibrated) by counterliturgies”?

2. Devote Yourself to “Doing What is Good" 

A primary point of our “counterliturgy,” the rhythm we live, is “good works” (or “doing what is good.”) The emphasis of the Greek text of Titus 3:8–11 is on “good works.” The discourse of the Greek text literally frames around this point. What’s “excellent and profitable for people”? To practice “good works,” “to devote themselves to good works.” How do those “who have believed [or trusted] in God” live? They practice “good works.”

The Christian is constantly searching in his or her life for the opportunity to do “good” for other people. As Paul shows us in Titus 2:11–14, the response of the Christian to Jesus is to do good in his name: the redemption God offers in Christ changes the way we live. What is “good”? That which benefits other people.

For example, in his letter to Timothy, Paul describes an impoverished widow who has done good works as having the following type of characteristics. She is a woman who:

“is well known for her good deeds, such as bringing up children, showing hospitality, washing the feet of the Lord’s people, helping those in trouble and devoting herself to all kinds of good deeds” (1 Timothy 5:10 NIV). 

In 1 Timothy 6:17–19, Paul says a rich person who has done good works will display a certain kind of character. Paul tells Timothy:

“Command them to do good, to be rich in good deeds, and to be generous and willing to share. In this way they will lay up treasure for themselves as a firm foundation for the coming age, so that they may take hold of the life that is truly life” (1 Timothy 6:17–19 NIV).

This is how we devote ourselves to “doing what is good”: In our wealth or in our poverty, we love people self-sacrificially, utilizing whatever resources are available to us. But we also need to go one step further to be relationally healthy.

3. Avoid Foolish Controversies and Prejudices

Paul has already told us how to act toward other people—the actions we should take daily. In Titus 3:9, he explains what we should avoid. Picking up on a thread from Titus 1:10–16, Paul says,

“But avoid foolish controversies and genealogies and arguments and quarrels about the law, because these are unprofitable and useless” (Titus 3:9 NIV).

Paul picks up on a liturgy of the culture of Crete that is also common today: controversies that do not have a point. Consider all the times that you have heard people argue over something that they can do nothing about. (This is the case for most political arguments.) As Christians, we need to step out of controversies when we can do nothing about them.

Paul then mentions “genealogies,” which were commonly used in Graeco-Roman society to include or exclude people. In the Christian community, there is no place for parentage being a deciding factor (or any factor at all) in defining our lives. We are all one in Christ (Galatians 3:28–29). Whenever tribe or family threatens to disrupt God’s community, we must stand against it (compare Mark 3:35). Unity must be the desire. 

From here, Paul addresses a quarrel that seems to have been happening over how to interpret the law (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy). It seems that there were some Jewish Christians on Crete who were trying to take a place of authority over Christians who were not of Jewish heritage (Titus 1:10–11). Paul opposes legalistic prejudice, especially when such legalism is evoked for “shameful gain” (Titus 1:11).

Whenever we as Christians find ourselves embattled in a debate, we must ask, “Will this further Jesus’ ways? Is there good to be had here, for the betterment of God’s community and mission?” If not, we should step back and change our behavior. Avoid foolish controversies and prejudices.

4. Relationally Healthy Ministry Prioritizes Unity

Rather than, “I’m right,” emotionally healthy ministry prioritizes unity. This is the point of Paul’s closing teaching in Titus:

“Warn a divisive person once, and then warn them a second time. After that, have nothing to do with them. You may be sure that such people are warped and sinful; they are self-condemned” (Titus 3:9–10 NIV).

If a person is seeking to be divisive, even after warning, then they are not really seeking God’s ways. In the process, they have condemned themselves by their actions. Paul here is asking the Christian community to be self-disciplined. He is saying, “If all else fails, prioritize the unity of the church.” It’s okay to say someone, “If you can’t learn to love people first, and if you insist on leading people astray with you into these foolish controversies, incorrect teachings, and prejudices, then I don’t think we have a place for you here.”

This is how seriously Paul takes the issue of unity. It is a priority, and thus there are boundaries.

What does relationally healthy ministry look like, according to Paul? It (1) Creates a counter-liturgy, a new rhythm of living; (2) involves people devoting themselves to what is good, the betterment of other people; (3) means people avoiding foolish controversies and prejudices; and (4) prioritizes unity, which means having boundaries with people.

This article is part of our series, "How to Authentically Live as a Christian: Paul's Letter to Titus."


Enjoy this article? Check out my new book, Jesus' Economy: A Biblical View of Poverty, the Currency of Love, and a Pattern for Lasting Change. With simple, everyday choices you can make the world a better place. Learn how to live Jesus' economy, the currency of love.

If you haven’t seen the Jesus’ Economy t-shirt, you’re missing out. Not only is it a great t-shirt, available in a few colors and styles, but it also embodies the spirit of the Jesus’ Economy Fair Trade model.

Initial designs for this product were done by the Jesus’ Economy creative team, KarBel Multimedia, in the United States. Jesus’ Economy then developed the design with the owner of Ugandan RWA Group, John Nyarwa (pictured here). Jesus’ Economy worked and communicated directly with John to ensure that each step of the process was handled with fair trade standards in mind. This effort was global in scale, all for the sake of making the world a better place, one job at a time.

Check Out the Jesus’ Economy Tee

 

Jesus’ Economy works with dozens of artisans to promote and sell their products on the western market. See more products in our Fair Trade Shop!

Shop Jesus' Economy T-Shirts

 

Christella, pictured here, saw the potential of global commerce to lift her community in Haiti out of poverty. She was one of the first artisans who joined the 2nd Story Goods' training school. Now, with the business, craft, and mentorship skills she has learned, she leads jewelry making for the community, which allows her to supplement her income, participate in job creation, and help support community growth.

Christella’s Beautiful Fair Trade Jewelry

 

Shop More Products by Christella

 

2nd Story Goods is a partner of Jesus’ Economy that co-labors with Haitian men and women to create wonderful products and revitalize their community. The artisans trained by 2nd Story Goods now have sustainable incomes and are making strides to break the cyclical poverty many were born into.

It is 2nd Story Goods' vision to help people move from poverty to abundance through education, creativity, and practical life experiences.

Psalm 23 captures our imagination as children and does so today. We read it at weddings and funerals alike. Why? Because we all want to to be pursued with a love that is beyond comprehension. This is what Psalm 23 keys in on.

But it's hard to see the love of God in a world that feels surrounded by death. But we've all seen it. A loyal love like God's is perhaps nowhere more seen than in the sacrificial mothers we've known. I think of my great-grandmother, Ma Murphy, who raised my mother. Her table was always open to the homeless, pregnant teenage girls, and children in need of a home. Ma Murphy's love also pursued prodigal children. It was a loyal love, loyal beyond all reason, like the kind of love we see from God.

God's love is loyal even when fail to be loyal ourselves. God's love is like that of a shepherd's. It pursues us.

I originally delivered this sermon at Faith Reformed Church in Lynden, WA on May 12, 2019 (Mother's Day). This sermon was prepared in collaboration with pastor J.D. Elgin. Get more sermons like this one by subscribing to the Jesus' Economy Podcast on iTunesSpotify, or SoundCloud.

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It is one thing to say you’re a Christian; it’s another thing to really act like it, in all aspects of life. What does the Christian life look like? How does the Christian react to his or her culture? What does the Christian do when the whole world seems to be a political minefield, and when culture seems to be against the Christian’s values? How do we align our thoughts and actions with God’s ways?

Throughout the book of Titus, Paul the apostle examines how to authentically live as a Christian—in all aspects of life. In Titus 3:1–7, we find that the key is resistance. We must resist the politically charged quarrels of our age. We must let our thoughts and actions be transformed by God.

How to Address the Political Difficulties of Our Age

“Remind the people to be subject to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready to do whatever is good, to slander no one, to be peaceable and considerate, and always to be gentle toward everyone” (Titus 3:1–2 NIV).

Paul’s words beg the question, how often have you sacrificed the gospel to make a point? How often is it that our political rhetoric becomes a hindrance of the gospel? Consider all the times that Christianity has been co-opted by a political party, leader, or view. Consider all the harm that has been done in the name of religion, in the name of “being right.”

How often have nations and people been torn apart by those two words, “I’m right”? It is a repeat, a cycle, of the same argument time and again.

Paul tells us to resist. The gospel is resistance. And so much more.

"Be Ready to Do Whatever is Good"

Let’s also be clear about what Paul is not saying: Paul is not saying, “never be political.” The gospel itself was political; after all, Paul was tried by Roman law because of his belief in Jesus. Jesus was killed because he threatened the political establishment. What Paul is saying is “choose your battles.” What are you really fighting for? What is it really about? Is this about a core value of Christianity, or have you been co-opted by a political party and ideal? 

The driver for the Christian life is “to be ready to do whatever is good” (Titus 3:1). It is in light of this greater good that Paul tells Christians to be obedient to rulers and authorities. It is also in light of this that Paul says, “to slander no one” and to instead “be peaceable and considerate, and always to be gentle toward everyone” (Titus 3:2).

The Greek word behind “to slander” in Titus 3:2 is βλασφημέω (blasphēmeō), which refers to speaking against someone for the purpose of causing harm. And isn’t this also what political rhetoric so often unravels into, name calling? Instead of the issue at hand, and what represents the good of individuals and humanity alike, the discussion unravels into slandering someone else. 

Paul says instead that we should seek peace and be considerate, that we should choose the road of gentleness toward everyone.

How to Live in a Politically Charged Age

From Titus 3:1–2, we can derive two points of action then for how to live in a politically charged age:

  1. place the gospel first, and
  2. resist the political evils that are far too common.

The Christian looks at the world and challenges the norms in his or her behavior, saying, “I love Jesus first. What’s best for his cause?” If a political move has to be made for that cause, such as a human rights issue, it will. But even when doing so, the Christian seeks to show other people respect and love, to approach everything with a spirit of gentleness.

Why Christians Live Differently

In Titus 3:1–2, Paul presents his instructions for believers on Crete. Then in Titus 3:3–7, he explains the theology behind his instructions.

"At one time we too were foolish, disobedient, deceived and enslaved by all kinds of passions and pleasures. We lived in malice and envy, being hated and hating one another. But when the kindness and love of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of righteous things we had done, but because of his mercy. He saved us through the washing of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior, so that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs having the hope of eternal life" (Titus 3:3–7 NIV).

The driving force behind the Christian life is “the kindness and love of God our Savior” who has appeared. The Christian aims to show the type of love he did: “he saved us, not because of righteous things we had done, but because of his mercy.”

Paul tells us that the Christian’s life is so radically altered that it is like a “washing of rebirth,” a “renewal by the Holy Spirit.” There is an inner cleansing of the Christian’s life via the Holy Spirit (Ephesians 5:26). It is the Holy Spirit that completely changes the life of the Christian, affecting how they think and feel, as they learn to love God with their whole being (Mark 12:29–31). We learn to live differently by thinking differently.

2 Ways to Transform Your Thoughts

Behind our actions are always our thoughts. It is our thought life that leads us to act like the people around us, rather than as Jesus calls us to live. The theology of Titus 3 suggests that when the Christian looks at the issues of our age, he or she will do so from two points of thought:

  1. I live with a spirit of kindness and love, because Jesus has shown that kindness and love to me. I lead with grace, because grace has been shown to me.
  2. I am being changed completely by God, which will affect my entire thought life and emotions. I lead with an openness to the Holy Spirit changing me.

This is a great hope that we live into. Paul says, that God has “poured out on us [the Holy Spirit], generously through Jesus Christ our Savior, so that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs having the hope of eternal life” (Titus 3:6–7).

Are You Being Changed by the Holy Spirit?

The type of changed life Paul saw is also what Jesus envisioned when he said, “Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again” (John 3:3). When Nicodemus asked him what this meant, Jesus replied: “You should not be surprised at my saying, ‘You must be born again.’ The wind blows wherever it pleases. You hear its sound, but you cannot tell where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit” (John 3:7–8).

It is this I stand in awe of, how the Holy Spirit can change me. How God declared me “justified by [Jesus’] grace,” through his sacrificial death. But in the resurrected life of Jesus, I can live, as one resurrected with him by the work of the Holy Spirit.

This gospel should change everything about how I think and how I act. The Spirit breathing on me, changing me, should alter my very life. It moves me from a mode of “I’m right” to a mode of love and grace. It moves me toward a spirit of kindness and love, as I am changed completely by God.

As Christians, we place the gospel first and resist the political evils that are far too common. We declare that the Holy Spirit has given us new life and hope—and we live into that.

This article is part of our series, "How to Authentically Live as a Christian: Paul's Letter to Titus."


Enjoy this article? Check out my new book, Jesus' Economy: A Biblical View of Poverty, the Currency of Love, and a Pattern for Lasting Change. With simple, everyday choices you can make the world a better place. Learn how to live Jesus' economy, the currency of love.

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