It is easy to take peace for granted. For us in the developed world, we have freedoms and safeties that are unknown concepts to people in impoverished nations around the world.

On this International Day of Peace, let's reflect on peace as a biblical concept and how standing together for the betterment of our world is good for everyone.

We Often Take Peace for Granted

Most of us in the developed world have peace in knowing where our next meal will come from and when we can expect our paycheck. We have peace because we feel safe in our homes. We have peace because we know we have family or neighbors who are capable of helping us if something goes wrong.

Yet the peace we have is something we don’t always appreciate. And this peace is not automatically given.

Peace Is Not a Given, We Have to Work for It

Peace has to be worked for, and that’s something God reminds us of repeatedly throughout Scripture. Peace takes effort, and effort means consciously rejecting the evils of the fallen world.

“Turn away from evil and do good; seek peace and pursue it” (Psalm 34:14 ESV).

Peace doesn’t come naturally or on it’s own; it has to be actively pursued. We know this because not all regions experience the same level of peace.

And a lack of peace can result in terrible things. We're witnessing countries where thousands of citizens flee in fear for their lives. We see instances of hundreds of people being denied access to clean water because they are considered to be an “unclean” caste. We see injustices and we have to stand against them. We have to take action.

Fair Trade Is One Way to Take Action

Many of the artisans behind the products in the Jesus' Economy Fair Trade Shop are from regions where peace isn’t assumed or guaranteed. When they wake up in the morning, they experience a very different world than you and I. Yet, despite the conditions of poverty and physical turmoil, these people get up every day and work hard to provide for themselves and their futures. They have hope and courage stronger than we can imagine.

When we support these artisans, we’re not just helping them become financially stable—we are also fighting for a future of peace for their families, communities, and countries. Fair trade is a way to support businesses that create peace. It's a way to take our simple everyday choices and advocate for the betterment of our world.

Why We Work Toward Peace

Peace is one of the fruits of the Spirit described by Paul (Galatians 5:22). Being peaceful and advocating for peace is a trait indicative of a faithful life. There will be pain and poverty in the world until Jesus returns, but we should walk alongside people in their pain, and pursue peace. Doing so reveals the love of God.

“Strive for peace with everyone, and for the holiness without which no one will see the Lord” (Hebrews 12:14 ESV).

We also need to recognize that true peace will never be found on earth, but is only found in God. He is bigger and more powerful than all war and poverty and suffering. He offers us a life beyond sin and death, and when we accept that, peace transcends our lives. When we rest in God’s truth, we have no reason to be afraid. Jesus reminded his disciples of this:

“Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be troubled, neither let them be afraid” (John 14:27 ESV).

True peace is only attainable in the Lord, and while we’re on earth, we get to share that peace with others. Jesus did not give us his peace to selfishly keep for ourselves. He gave it to us so we could go out with the same confidence and love, and do his will.

 

Help us alleviate poverty and bring peace to those who don't have any by donating today.

 

Global catastrophes sadden us. The images are terrifying and experiencing such moments in history are deeply painful. Why does God allow this to go on? Is God causing it? Where is God in hurricanes and pain? Here are some answers that make sense biblically.

God Is Opposed to Storms

When God first created the world, he pushed back the chaos. He brought order where none existed. This is what much of Genesis 1–2 is about. This is why God’s focus at the beginning is the sky and the waters. He is pushing back the madness. He calls doing so “good.” 

When God’s will is connected to natural disasters in the Old Testament—like the flooding of the earth—God is not happy about it. It’s a last resort. It means God letting his own work be undone. He isn’t causing the big disasters in the Old Testament; he is moving out of the way of the disasters that would be present otherwise. He wants order, not the chaos of storms. The storms sadden God. (Why destroy what you created? God wouldn’t want to destroy his own creation.)

The Harvey and Irma Disasters are Natural—Not Caused

God reaches his last resort in very distinct moments, like when an entire city has turned away from righteousness. This was the case for Sodom and Gomorrah, where not even ten righteous people could be found (Genesis 18:32–19:29). This was also the case for the flooding of the earth—only Noah and his family were found to be righteous (Genesis 6–8).

I know righteous people in the areas affected by Harvey and Irma; you probably know plenty of righteous people there too. If we do the math and run the probability of God causing all this, the answer here is pretty clear: God doesn’t want this. Instead, it’s caused by the chaos that still exists in the world. This type of chaos has been present ever since people went against God—ever since the fall of humankind with Adam and Eve (Genesis 3). Chaos was reintroduced into the world on that day. But there is good news in the midst of this sadness.

Things Can Change and Improve

When Jesus came, died, and was resurrected, the very fabric of the relationship between people and God changed. Likewise, the relationship between people and the out-of-control creation changed. (Chaos took a serious blow.) Paul describes it this way:

“For we know that the whole creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now. And not only the creation, but we ourselves … as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies” (Romans 8:22–23 ESV).

Creation awaits the full redemption of Christ, just as our very bodies—which are currently subject to death—await that redemption.

Jesus brought full reconciliation with God the Father to humanity. And one day all of creation will experience the full meaning of redemption. We have signs of this already in the acts of Christ.

Jesus calmed storms (Mark 4:35–41). Jesus walked on water (Matthew 14:22–33). Jesus talked about how to build spiritual houses that would withstand storms (Matthew 7:24–27). Jesus sent the Holy Spirit, which empowers us to do his work (John 14:15–31). We are able to look into the eye of the storm with hope because we know what is to come.

Chaos Still Exists Because Jesus Hasn’t Returned Yet

Pain and turmoil still exist because Jesus has not returned yet. Peter puts it this way:

“The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise [of returning to earth] as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance” (2 Peter 3:10 ESV).

It is because of God’s great mercy that Jesus has not returned yet—because God wants to see many people come unto salvation. This is also why we have not seen creation completely redeemed.

When we experience great catastrophes in our world, it’s easy to doubt God’s mercy. It’s easy for us to look to God and place blame on him. But remember that one day new creation will come to be, when Jesus returns. Every tear will be wiped away and chaos will be completely put to rest. Death itself will end on that day (see Revelation 19–21).

We Can Pray and We Can Act

Please pray for those in the midst of the chaos or recovering from it. Please pray for the chaos to be pushed back. Please pray because it matters. It can change things.

And take action. Support and encourage those living in the eye of the storm. Show them your love. You can even volunteer to help people rebuild. Or you can give fiscally to the relief efforts. There is power in God’s people coming together to fight back against the chaos. It shows that we believe that chaos won’t win.

 

Get more free articles like this one, our daily devotional, and updates: Subscribe now. This long-form article is part of our weekly series, “Living for Jesus.”

 

This article is adapted in part from my older blog post “Is God Angry at the East Coast?” published on ConversantLife.com.

Fall is quickly approaching and we have some wonderful products you’ll love as the summer closes. From autumn fashion to school essentials, we have you covered.

 

Necklaces from Haiti: The Victoria

We’re breaking out the sweaters from the corners of our closets, and what better to pair with a cardigan than a simple and chic necklace? This necklace is handmade by artisans of a jewelry making guild in Jubilee, Haiti out of aluminum and goat leather. This necklace will wonderfully accent your fall wardrobe while supporting fair trade in the process.

 

Journals from Haiti: Goat Leather

Whether you’re heading back to school or working the same job you’ve worked for 10 years, a new journal is a great way to ring in the changing seasons. There is always something to write down; consider choosing this sleek journal handmade by leather artisans in Haiti.

 

Scarves from Haiti: Blue Batik 

The weather is getting just a little colder, and with it, you’ll want to bundle up a little more. This scarf created by artisans in Haiti is a perfect option. It’s not too thick and is a great way to stay warm but look cool. Buy this beautiful scarf and support artisans in Haiti through fair trade.

 

Daisy Chain, Handmade in Haiti 

You might be stuck indoors more now, but you can still remember summer with this delicate and beautiful daisy chain, perfect for wall decoration. This whimsical ornament is perfect for dressing up any room, and for making a statement about hope.

 

Fair Trade Brings Hope to Artisans in Haiti 

2nd Story Goods, a division of Much Ministries and partner of Jesus' Economy, co-labors with Haitian men and women on the outskirts of Gonaives, Haiti, to make beautiful things. These products create sustainable incomes for Haitian families. It is 2nd Story Goods' vision to help people move from poverty to abundance through education, creativity, and practical life experiences. Haiti has a 40 percent unemployment rate (World Bank, 2010), so the work of 2nd Story Goods is desperately needed.

Jesus’ Economy is dedicated to alleviating global poverty, and partnerships with organizations like 2nd Story Goods are the perfect way to empower artisans as they work toward more hopeful futures.

Join us in this mission and shop fair trade today.

When I traveled to Northeast India, to one of the last unreached people groups in the world, I was making a good salary and a nice home. But this last year, my wife and I sold nearly all of our stuff and followed Jesus into the unknown of leading the non-profit Jesus’ Economy full-time without a salary. We sold our stuff, including our house, to make it work. The reason: We can’t live in a world where there are people without a voice and where there are people who have not heard the name of Jesus. We cannot live in a world where there are solutions to poverty and bringing the gospel to the unreached, and not take action.

In Northeast India, I saw the Holy Spirit work—and I saw the liberty of Jesus completely transform lives. Those who had formerly never heard Jesus’ name were so grateful that they now knew Jesus. But there are still 101 Million there who have not heard Jesus’ name. How can I live in a world like this and not do something about it? I also had other reasons for making such a drastic life change.

How could I not serve a God who has given me my very voice? God helped me learn to speak—95% of what I said as a child could not be understood but I now speak perfectly. How could I not be willing to give up everything to follow this God?

Creating a more equitable and just world is part of my calling, as is bringing the gospel to those who have not heard Jesus’ name. It’s how I’m called to use my voice. 

But I think we’re all called to this mission. It will look different for each of us, but what’s certain is that Jesus will drastically change your life. Here are three biblical lessons that I regularly come back to during this journey.

1. The Bible Envisions a More Just World

The Bible’s grand vision for the world is seen at the end of Revelation. It’s a world where there are no more tears, where there is no more pain, where God’s people stand equal and in loving relationship before God. The Bible’s trajectory is clear—evil will be destroyed and good will be restored. Justice and equity in their full form will exist when Jesus returns.

The followers of Jesus will sit down at a table and celebrate. They will celebrate justice and equality for all. They will celebrate what Jesus has done (see Revelation 19; 21).

In the meantime, we’re called to be ambassadors of this message—to be people who help make way for the kingdom of God here and now. Global equality can come to our world. Justice can come to our world. We can create equal opportunities for all. Each person can have a place at this table. And when we make these opportunities for the impoverished, we bring a piece of the kingdom of God here.

2. The Bible Calls Us to Use the Opportunities God Has Provided

One of the things we often forgotten about the story of the Good Samaritan is that it involves one man responding to an opportunity to do good. A Samaritan sees a man who is beaten and poor on the side of the road—and he takes care of him. He steps in when all others have ignored the hurting man on the side of the road. The Samaritan sees an opportunity to do good and acts upon it (Luke 10:25–37).

Today, we likewise have an opportunity to do good. We often forget that there are opportunities right in front of us, each and everyday, to change the lives of the hurting. There are opportunities to help our neighbors who are far away and to engage in relationship with those who are near.

Doing good betters our entire world. Creating opportunities for the impoverished, outcast, and marginalized to be empowered is good for us all. What’s good for you can be good for me; what’s good for them can be good for us. Because we’re all connected in some way or another—in some sort of loose affiliation. We’re all human after all.

3. The Bible Calls Us to See How We’re All Interconnected

In the book of Romans, Paul the Apostle notes that he intends to travel to Spain (Romans 15:24). This is because he plans to bring the gospel to the far western point of the known world of the time. Meanwhile, Thomas the Apostle—according to Syrian church tradition—was bringing the gospel to India. That’s the far East of the known world of the time. There is a global trajectory here. This is a direct reflection of Jesus’ command to bring the gospel to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8).

While on this path, the early church leaders recognized just how interconnected their efforts were. We see this when Paul raises funds for the impoverished in Jerusalem (Romans 15:26). We also see it in the numerous mentions of other churches in Paul’s letters. And we see this interconnectedness in the story of the book of Acts, which involves multiple missions out from the Jerusalem church and the church at Antioch to bring the gospel to other cities and regions.

Our world is more interconnected today than ever before. And we can leverage these connections for the sake of the gospel. The work of the early church is far from complete. So my question becomes: What are we going to do about it? And what do you see when you look at the world?

When I look at our world, I can see how we can create a new, global and spiritual economy for those that need it most. I can see how the thirsty can have clean water. I can see how marginalized women can have gainful employment that lifts their entire families out of poverty. I can see businesses in the developing world creating opportunities for us here in the U.S. I can see the freedom and liberty of Jesus being accessible to all. I can see us rallying together around the common good of equality for everyone. I can see grace reaching every person.

How is Jesus asking you to drastically change your life?

 

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Every choice we make has an impact that ripples out farther. As we fight to alleviate global poverty, we are reminded of the chain that is created when we help just one person.

Through the Empowering Women program in Bihar, India, 40 women will receive business training so they can turn their existing struggling businesses into thriving businesses that sell products internationally.

But it doesn’t stop there. Each of those 40 women has a family. She probably has at least two children. When her business flourishes, she is able to provide for her family. She will be able to afford for her children to go to school. Her children will gain an education, become literate, and have a better future. These children will go on to have kids who will also be able to attend school; and the financial stability ripples onward.

No one action is isolated. If one woman is funded to go through the training program, she lifts her entire family out of poverty, and creates a stable foundation for all her descendants to come.

The training helps the individuals and the families, but also the community. As the financial state of families improves through the success of the businesses, Bihar will also obtain increasing economic strength. When the businesses start selling their products internationally, a door is opened for more money flow in Bihar. Today, the businesses are only selling to local people; money doesn’t leave the villages, and money doesn’t come in. It's essentially trading hands over and over again. But in the future, opportunities for ecommerce will improve the economy on a larger scale, thus helping lift the entire community out of poverty, too.

Ending poverty isn’t an overnight thing. It’s going to take time, but we have to start somewhere. Let’s start with the 40 women and their families.

So far, we have raised $4,685. The entire program costs $23,000. Let’s do the math. If each of the 40 women are supporting two other people, that means 120 people will be directly lifted out of poverty through the program. This means it takes $190 to lift a person out of poverty, or $575 to empower a woman to lift her whole family out of poverty. That’s a small amount of money when you think about the immeasurable impact it will have.

We still need to raise $18,315. If 100 people donated just $10, we’d be $1,000 closer to our goal. Want to help us get there?

By partnering with us, you can empower a woman in Bihar, India to change the cycle of poverty for the future of her family. Be a part of this change and consider giving financially today.

100 percent of your donations go directly to India to support job creation efforts.

 

We look around us and are daunted by the poverty and suffering and darkness we see. We know it will take a lot of work to change, and we know God asks us to, but we often choose to sit back and wait.

It’s easy to be lazy and complacent and wait for other people to do the work. But these are some of the most dangerous ideals. They threaten the kingdom of God. The whole body of Christ needs to be working together if we are going to get things done. Even if the hands are equipped with a hammer and nails, they can’t get anything done if the feet don’t take them to the construction site. We simply have to rely on each other. Paul uses the body metaphor in 1 Corinthians to remind the church of the importance of unity. He says:      

“But God has so composed the body, giving greater honor to the part that lacked it, that there may be no division in the body, but that the members may have the same care for one another. If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together.” (1 Corinthians 12:24b-26 ESV)

We have our own jobs, families, and lives, and these things help us justify spiritual laziness in the church. Sometimes, we don’t even notice we are failing to act because we feel like it’s a positive thing to be investing in ourselves. Laziness can, and often does, mask itself as selfish hard work. We might be working for recognition and self-righteousness instead of in love and for Christ. But we have to acknowledge that work done for the wrong reasons has no place in the kingdom of God.

The body of Christ needs to be operating together—and it needs to be moving with the intent God desires. When believers do things for the wrong reasons, the action itself is rooted in selfishness and sin. The action may be fruitful for a time, but it will crumble because it has the wrong foundation. The church cannot stand on actions carried out without love. Paul understood that it is difficult for believers to be united for the right reasons:  

“And I will show you a still more excellent way. If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal.” (1 Corinthians 12:31b-13:1 ESV)

I know we’re all a little tired; it seems like less work to focus on our lives than it is to participate in a body of believers. It’s especially hard when we don’t call all the shots. Listening to God’s direction, and any leader’s direction, makes us incredibly vulnerable. When we start putting others first, we stop guarding ourselves as much as we like to.

But it is vital that we do this. We radiate God’s love when we love others. And the body of believers will not lose anything by rejecting selfishness, and choosing love instead. Paul reminds us:

“If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing.” (1 Corinthians 13:3 ESV)

It’s not enough to have action without love, and it’s not enough to love without action. The things we do on a daily basis should be in response to the callings God puts on our lives. We need to be giving it all we have. Paul returns to this issue in his letter to the Colossians:

“And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.” (Colossians 3:17 ESV)

Let us, as the church, check our motivations at the door and leave our selfishness at the foot of the cross. Think of what we could accomplish together, if we truly acted as one, with a heart of love and thankfulness:

“Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men.” (Colossians 3:23 ESV)

Satan wants a lazy church. We fail when we work for people and not for the Lord. But if we, as different members of the same body, rely on love—if we root ourselves in the foundation of God’s love—we can bring real change and light to the world.

 

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Jesus' Economy is transforming lives and empowering women in Bihar, India. In a state where millions live in extreme poverty, it can seem impossible to have hope. But the people of Bihar are strong and resilient and we are coming alongside them as they lift their families and community out of poverty. 

Bihar, India has a population of nearly 104 Million. More than 54 Million of those people live in extreme poverty. Most of their food sources are dependent on the weather, which during monsoon season often means few crops. 

These families do not have enough money to provide for themselves on a basic level, and this makes for very poor living conditions.

Bihar has a women empowerment measure of .379, ranking among the top 10 worst in the world. In this state, a large percentage of the women are illiterate and jobless, and have no means to help themselves. But with our church planters providing literacy training, they have a chance at a new life. 

Many women and children spend their days walking miles to collect drinkable water. By the time they've gathered this necessity, there isn't much time left in the day for work or an education, and the cycle of poverty continues. 

To help meet the basic need of clean and safe water, Jesus' Economy has funded the drilling of four water wells. Now thousands of people have access to good water; women are able to work, and children are able to go to school. 

We have also funded four church planters. These pastors are actively sharing the gospel with hundreds of people throughout the new home churches and bringing peace to these people and their villages.

With the physical and spiritual needs being met, Jesus' Economy is now focused on long-term sustainability. Forty women in Bihar will be trained to run their own businesses so they can lift their families out of poverty. 

As part of the empowering women program, women learn the trade of creating high-quality, handmade clothing, as well as business skills and employer (fair trade) ethics.

The women will become successful businesswomen, thus able to support their families financially, and the cycle of poverty will be disrupted. Their incomes will allow for physical sustenance, and also for the opportunity for their children to go to school regularly. 

 The women of Bihar, India are immeasurably strong and full of hope for a better future.

Donate to the Empowering Women Program and help end poverty in Bihar. 

 

When our CEO, John D. Barry, traveled to Bihar, India, he met women who inspired him to start our empowering women program

The women he met were resourceful, strong, spirited, joyful, and full of hope. He witnessed their hope through trials and wanted to do something to empower them even further. Women in Bihar spend their days working hard to provide for their families but when the day comes to a close, it's still not enough. 

They walk miles to get to the nearest water well for clean water and by the time they get back home, there's barely enough time left in the day to purchase what little produce they can afford, make meals with rationing in mind, wash clothing by hand, and take care of their children. And yet, they keep going. Day after day. And still they find ways to smile. They have learned how to be content no matter their situation. 

One woman spoke to John about her hardships. She said, "I can now afford to keep my kids in school, but keeping food on their plates often feels impossible. I am constantly facing the decision of whether to eat or pay for school supplies or clothing for my children. Will you pray for me and my children?" She could pay for her kids to go to school through her sewing work, which she learned via a non-profit sewing school, but her business needed a boost.

This woman worked hard but still couldn't provide the basic needs for her family. But here she was, thankful that she could keep her kids in school and asking John to pray for her because she believed there was a way. She believed that some day she wouldn't have to constantly worry about meeting their basic needs. She had hope. 

Help us bring hope to more women in Bihar, India by donating to our empowering women program and see a community transformed.  

We cannot end extreme poverty without the church. The gospel is key to renewing our world. Here’s why.

The gospel demands action. Those actions can change entire communities. From Jesus’ very commission of the church forward, this is clear:

“Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19–20 ESV).

This call to discipleship is a call to teach people to follow Jesus and his principles (compare James 1:27). Making disciples means teaching people what following Jesus really means. It means teaching integrity, honesty, and love of the hurting. It means showing them that salvation is not just a truth, but also an ideal that changes the very fabric of our world.

Jesus’ calls the Christian to represent truth and help others see the value of that truth. We are to be light in dark places (Matthew 5:15). And here’s what that has to do with poverty.

For the situation of extreme poverty to change, we need to create economic opportunities for the impoverished and fight corruption. This means real people taking real action. But it also means an ethical presence transforming communities and holding people accountable to truth.

In a single day corruption can overthrow years of good. This is why I believe that healthy churches are a core part of creating global equality. If we can provide an ethical framework through the church, there will be a stronghold against corruption. We will have people who will speak up for what’s right.

Churches can help hold people accountable to paying fair wages and not exploiting anyone. Churches can be the voice of truth. As an outside investor, I can even ask a local and healthy church to help with reporting about a business. (In fact, I personally do this now.)

We must create jobs and churches in the developing world. And we must also meet basic needs. A job doesn’t matter if I don’t have access to clean water. Where basic needs are not being met, we must give and meet them.

Global Poverty Affects Us All

What happens in our world affects us all, whether we acknowledge it or not. A desperate community in the developing world is the problem of all of us.

Desperation has created desperate people. And desperate people do desperate things. Desperation gives extremism a foothold. If you lack access to water, healthcare, education, and job opportunities, an extremist leader can come along and claim “The Americans, with all those opportunities and all that wealth, have ignored you.” The extremist can then say, “I will care for your village, if you join our cause.” And when the extremist says these words, and you’re desperate, it’s tempting to listen. 

The desperation of the globally impoverished is a desperate situation for our world. When wars rage in our world, they also rage here. Peace for one person is peace for us all.

Yes, we must fight terror. But we’re also trying to change hearts and minds. We have to fight desperation by offering better opportunities to the impoverished and outsider.

The Voiceless Are Like You and Me

I have met the voiceless of the developing world and spoken to them about their needs. I remember sitting in a circle with a group of women from extreme poverty situations in Northeast India. I remember one woman placing her hands in mine and saying, “I can now afford to keep my kids in school, but keeping food on their plates often feels impossible. I am constantly facing the decision of whether to eat or pay for school supplies or clothing for my children. Will you pray for me and my children?" She could pay for her kids to go to school through her sewing work, which she learned via a non-profit sewing school, but her business needed a boost. 

Women like this are ready to work hard to offer their children a better life; they just need the opportunity. Together, we can offer them the opportunity they deserve. We can connect them to the global marketplace.

Let’s end desperation. Let’s make a better way for our world. Let’s be the truth and light God has called us to be. Explaining this principle, Jesus said:

“You are the salt of the earth, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people’s feet. You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house” (Matthew 5:13–15 ESV).

And is there much more to say than that?

 

Join us in our endeavor to help women become independent and build strong businesses by donating to our microloan fund

Any skill has less value if it is not paired with practical application. At Jesus’ Economy, we recognize this, and we work to put practicality into action as we alleviate poverty.

As part of our Renew Bihar, India project, we are raising funds to train women in tailoring and business so they will become equipped to more successfully run their own businesses. This is part of the empowering women program.

A trainer will teach 40 women how to expand their business in a one-week training session on product development, employee management, accounting, and business ethics. After that training is complete, another trainer will offer two weeks of hands-on product development training and further business ethics. The product development trainer will then be available for the following 10 weeks to offer free consulting to the women.

A Platform for International Business Success

These business skills will need practical application. This will come as a platform for business in a western market. Rather than teach the women of Bihar useful skills and then step out of the picture, Jesus’ Economy is dedicated to working alongside them and helping their businesses flourish.

After the training, the women will be eligible for a microloan from Jesus’ Economy to purchase supplies for their expanding businesses. The microloan fund will cover up to 20 women, anticipating that only 50 percent of the women in the program will also choose to receive the microloan. A microloan from Jesus’ Economy will help a woman purchase supplies for her expanding business.

After all the women—not just the ones who choose the microloan—are trained and have a year to create products, Jesus’ Economy will purchase the goods and sell them in our online fair trade shop. The fair trade shop will provide a large customer base for these businesses, and having these products in one market will increase the buying power of the customer base. We will provide a western market connection, and their businesses will continue to grow. The growth of businesses means more jobs, and more jobs means more connections. Combining business training with e commerce creates a cycle of success and empowerment rather than one of poverty and hardship.

Jesus’ Economy is changing the economic paradigm by becoming the guaranteed buyer of the products and selling them online. The women will have moved from being tailors and seamstresses to running a full company that sells products internationally. Bringing business training and e commerce together to alleviate poverty.  

Jesus’ Economy has a heart for alleviating poverty through fair trade. Our empowering women program will help women in Bihar, India financially support their families and break the cycle of poverty. Join us in the movement!

 

Join us in our endeavor to help women become independent and build strong businesses by donating to our microloan fund

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