Right now, you can save 33% on select aprons from Guatemala. These beautiful, handwoven aprons are all fair trade. Your apron purchase creates and sustains jobs for women overcoming poverty in Guatemala. This closeout deal is only available while supplies last, so shop soon.

Still Fair Trade, but on Sale

Because fair trade is all about ensuring everyone in the supply chain is paid fairly, we rarely are able to put items on sale on JesusEconomy.org. Today's price is already the best price we can offer. But every once in awhile, a special opportunity comes along where we can honor our fair trade commitment while offering you an even better deal. Such is the case when it comes to a closeout deal on a particular product line.

Our partners in Guatemala, Mayamam Weavers, are working on some new styles and thus we're able to offer a special deal on some closeout items from last year's product line. That makes this deal on aprons really rare.

Save 33% On These Fair Trade Aprons

 

 

The Story Behind These Handmade Aprons

Mayamam Weavers, a partner of Jesus' Economy, creates handwoven home goods and accessories for modern living—inspired by the rich colors, patterns, and traditional weaving techniques of Mayan culture. Mayamam Weavers was founded in 2008 as a cooperative of women in Cajolá, a Mayan town in the western highlands of Guatemala. To overcome poverty, the women came together to provide jobs within their community, rather than migrate to the U.S. and separate their families. The co-op has now grown to 20 weavers and seamstresses, all earning fair trade wages while learning the skills to run a business.

Save on Aprons from Guatemala

 

Shakespeare said, "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players." There are many players in the biblical story. In this grand play across time, with God as the great author of history, we are invited to see ourselves in the characters. There is one act in this grand play that stands above the rest: the great moment of the resurrection. But in this story, there are characters who have been neglected, forgotten, overlooked. Yet, they are the greatest source of inspiration. They are the women who stood by Jesus.

In this sermon, I examine Mark 16, suggesting that we should all emulate the women who stood by Jesus. We should be witnesses in God's grand story like the women were.

This sermon was originally delivered at Faith Reformed Church in Lynden, WA on April 21, 2019 (Easter Sunday).

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Happy International Women’s Day to you strong women (yes, that’s all women)!

It’s International Women’s Day, and while every day is a perfect day to honor and celebrate women, we want to recognize that right now is a great time to start a conversation about gender equality and how this impacts poverty. And hopefully the conversation and the resulting actions continue beyond today.

Historically, women have not been given the same economic opportunities as men, especially in developing countries, and while this has been changing, there is still work to be done. When women are empowered and supported so that they can provide stability for themselves and their families, poverty shrinks, hope is created, and God is glorified.

There are many ways to empower women around the world. Jesus’ Economy is working with an existing program in Bihar, India to do just this.

In Bihar, a state in extreme poverty, families are forced into a repeated cycle of poverty in which their basic needs are not met. But Jesus’ Economy is partnering with a program there that teaches women tailoring and seamstress skills; and then adding innovative business training and microfinance to these efforts. With this program, we will create sustainable jobs for the impoverished.

This is Jesus’ Economy’s Empowering Women Program.

A Program to Create Opportunity

The day Jesus’ Economy decided to launch this plan is a day CEO John D. Barry will never forget. A woman placed her hands in his and wept. She said, “I can now afford to keep my kids in school, but keeping food on their plates often feels impossible. I am constantly facing the decision of whether to eat or pay for school supplies or clothing for my children. Will you pray for me and my children?” She could pay for her kids to go to school through her sewing work, which she learned via a non-profit sewing school, but her business needed a boost.

Women like this are ready to work hard to offer their children a better life; they just need the opportunity. Together, we can give them this chance for a hopeful future. Jesus’ Economy is offering graduates of the sewing program the chance to learn how to make products for a western market—as well as learn business basics and ethical business practices.

Our partner in Bihar has already taught women how to sew, but they need the additional business skills to become successful and sustainable.

Business Will Change the Cycle of Poverty

Our business-training program will teach 40 women how to expand their businesses. The training has two phases. First, a trainer will come in and offer a one-week training session on product development, employee management, handling accounts, and running an ethical, fair trade business.

The second phase involves hands-on product development training. This will be a two-week session that guides the women through their own product development cycle and further business ethics training. This trainer will be available for an additional 10 weeks for free consulting to the women. By the end of the training, the women will be equipped to sell high-quality products locally and on the western market. They will have moved from tailors to successful international businesswomen.

After the training, the women will be eligible for a microloan from Jesus’ Economy to purchase supplies for their expanding business. Jesus' Economy also changes the economic paradigm by becoming the guaranteed buyer of the products the women are creating. Jesus' Economy will sell these products in our fair trade shop.

Business-training ultimately fights against the cycle of poverty, and gives women hope of changing the future for generations to come.

International Women’s Day isn’t just about celebrating what women have accomplished. It is also about recognizing what we can still do to empower women and work to put an end to global poverty.

On this International Women’s Day, you can empower a woman in Bihar, India to lift her family out of poverty, and bring positive change to the world.  

Today is World Day of Prayer, "a worldwide, ecumenical movement of Christian women of many traditions who come together to observe a common day of prayer each year, and who, in many countries, have a continuing relationship in prayer and service." World Day of Prayer "promotes justice and equality for women through prayer, partnerships, service and celebration." These are principles that we at Jesus' Economy full heartedly affirm.

We Believe in the Power of Prayer

Here at Jesus' Economy, we believe that God can do all things through prayer (see our article, "Prayer that Causes Earthquakes"). Since the founding of Jesus' Economy in 2012, we have kept a prayer request list and asked you to join us by praying. Like the World Day of Prayer movement, we believe in empowering women. Business opportunities, especially for women in regions that are oppressive for women, are the key to that empowerment.

Pray with Us for Women Overcoming Poverty

Today, we ask you to join us in praying for two things:

  1. The many female artisans that Jesus' Economy supports through our online Fair Trade Shop. Through fair trade, artisans all over the world are overcoming poverty. Pray that the businesses of the women Jesus' Economy supports may continue to grow, so that they can provide for themselves, their families, and create jobs for other people in need.
  2. The Empowering Women initiative of our Renew Bihar, India campaign. The women empowerment ranking of Bihar, India is .379, making it one of the top ten worst places in the world for women. We have a vision for launching a new stage of business training for women in Northeast India, which includes providing microloans and connecting female entrepreneurs to opportunities to sell their products (especially in our online Fair Trade Shop). The launch phase of the project is currently 56% funded and it needs more support. Pray for the women of Bihar, India and that Jesus' Economy can generate the funds to launch our Empowering Women initiative in Bihar.

We believe that through prayer, anything can happen. God has provided a grand vision for Jesus’ Economy and we need to join in prayer to make it happen. Thank you for joining with us in prayer, especially for the women around the world who need the empowerment of business opportunities.

Today is International Women’s Day, a day set aside to celebrate the achievements of women all over the world. Historically, women have not been given the same economic opportunities, especially in developing countries, as men, and while this has been changing, there is still work to be done. When women are empowered and supported so that they can provide stability for themselves and their families, poverty shrinks, hope is created, and God is glorified.

There are many ways to empower women around the world. Jesus’ Economy is working with an existing program in Bihar, India to do just this.

In Bihar, a state in extreme poverty, families are forced into a repeated cycle of poverty in which their basic needs are not met. In Bihar, a program exists to teach women tailoring and seamstress skills. Jesus’ Economy is partnering with this program to add a new, innovative business-training program. With this program, we will create sustainable jobs for the impoverished.

This is Jesus’ Economy’s Empowering Women Program.

A Program to Create Opportunity

The day Jesus’ Economy decided to launch the program is a day CEO John D. Barry will never forget. A woman placed her hands in his and wept. She said, “I can now afford to keep my kids in school, but keeping food on their plates often feels impossible. I am constantly facing the decision of whether to eat or pay for school supplies or clothing for my children. Will you pray for me and my children?” She could pay for her kids to go to school through her sewing work, which she learned via a non-profit sewing school, but her business needed a boost.

Women like this are ready to work hard to offer their children a better life; they just need the opportunity. Together, we can give them this chance for a hopeful future. Jesus’ Economy is offering graduates of the sewing program the chance to learn how to make products for a western market—as well as learn business basics and ethical business practices.

Our partner in Bihar has already taught women how to sew, but they need the additional business skills to become successful and sustainable.

Business Training Will Change the Cycle of Poverty

Our business-training program will teach 40 women how to expand their businesses. The training has two phases. First, a trainer will come in and offer a one-week training session on product development, employee management, handling accounts, and running an ethical, fair trade business.

The second phase involves hands-on product development training. This will be a two-week session that guides the women through their own product development cycle and further business ethics training. This trainer will be available for an additional 10 weeks for free consulting to the women. By the end of the training, the women will be equipped to sell high-quality products locally and on the western market. They will have moved from tailors to successful international businesswomen.

After the training, the women will be eligible for a microloan from Jesus’ Economy to purchase supplies for their expanding business. Jesus' Economy also changes the economic paradigm by becoming the guaranteed buyer of the products the women are creating. Jesus' Economy will sell these products in our fair trade shop.

Business-training ultimately fights against the cycle of poverty, and gives women hope of changing the future for generations to come.

International Women’s Day isn’t just about celebrating what women have accomplished. It is also about recognizing what we can still do to empower women and work to put an end to global poverty.

On this International Women’s Day, you can empower a woman in Bihar, India to lift her family out of poverty, and bring positive change to the world.

This article was adapted from, “Empowering Women in One of the Poorest States in the World."

Our Fair Trade Shop is full of several handmade products that we love, and one item we have a lot of are beautiful sets of earrings. We've picked five pairs that you'll be sure to fall in love with and want to purchase whether it's for you, your mom, best friend, or sister. 

Earrings from Rwanda: Colorful Woven Loop 

These trendy disc earrings are made by a group of female weavers from Rwanda. They are made with all-natural sisal fibers, using an age old basket weaving technique to create lightweight discs that feel elegant to wear. Completing the look, the hoops are fastened onto hypoallergenic earring hooks.

Earrings from Haiti: Leather Feather

These handmade, fair trade earrings are modern and chic. Made by a co-op of Haitian women from Jubilee, Haiti, each earring represents a great cause. These ladies have dreams of running their own businesses, sending their kids to school, and supporting their families.

Earrings from Haiti: Hammered Loop 

Loop earrings are a great asset to any woman’s jewelry collection. Add this pair for a unique and modern touch. Hand-hammered in Haiti, these earrings are a fashionable accessory that will complete your look and empower artisans through fair trade.

Earrings from Brazil: Golden Grass Ropa

Golden grass is a protected resource, and its raw grasses cannot be exported. Only the finished grass products of the indigenous peoples of Brazil can be brought into your home--making these items unique and valuable. It is durable, flexible and lightweight, making it perfect for jewelry.

Earrings from Haiti: Trendy Tassel

Not just for ceremony, you can wear these tassel earrings any day you like! And you'll have reason to celebrate when you realize that you've helped women in extreme poverty situations earn a living.

Whatever your style or preference, we know you will be able to find a set of earrings you'll want to wear time and time again. Shop fair trade jewelry to empower women all over the globe. 

Anyone who loves to be in the kitchen or who loves to entertain guests knows kitchen products are important. Having the right tools or table settings can make all the difference. That's why you or the chef in your life will love our kitchen line from Mayamam Weavers. 

The artisan co-op, Mayamam Weavers, is a group of women from Guatemala who refuse to leave their home country and families behind to make a living. So they made a way to support themselves and their families while staying in their communities. They weave all of their products by hand on looms using different techniques and tie in their Mayan culture. 

Here's 5 Kitchen Products the Chef in your Life will Love 

1. Table Runners from Guatemala: Mustard Plaid

This table runner is made from sturdy, handwoven cotton. It's also machine washable and dryable, which is a big plus. Most table runners are delicate and need to be washed by hand which is tough to manage when after almost every time you use it, it has food stains on it. But this one? Throw it in the machine and you're set. It also comes in celery plaid and ocean plaid. 

2. Kitchen Gift Set from Guatemala: "Cajola Red" Pot Holder and Towel

This sturdy handwoven cotton set comes in a variety of colors and patterns. The potholder features a loop for hanging, doubles as a gripper, and is lined with insulbrite. Both the towel and the pot holder are machine washable and dryable. 

3. Aprons from Guatemala: Mustard and Eggplant

The Mayamam Weavers group handweaves a multitude of aprons, in a variety of styles, patterns, and colors. My personal favorite is the bistro style and you just know the chef in your life would love one of these styles to wear while they work in the kitchen. 

4. Table Napkin Sets from Guatemala: Celebration in Magenta

 

 

 These napkins come in a set of four with mitred corners and are 20" x 20". They are handwoven and come in a variety of bright colors and patterns that are sure to make your table pop.

5. Dish Cloths from Guatemala: "Red and White" Hache Weave

These dish cloths are made with a hache weave which is perfect for working as a scrubbing dish cloth. It's also highly absorbent and features a twill hook for hanging. The dish cloths woven by hand come in many different colors and patterns and come two to a set. 

Shop these kitchen products and more in our collection from Guatemala in our Fair Trade Shop.

Remember, there's only a few days left to order first class mail and receive it by Christmas. 

Christmas shoppers please note: the last day to order Rwandan products in time for Christmas is December 18. Also, Jesus' Economy will be unable to ship Nepali products between the dates of December 16 to January 4.

 

You can never have too many bags. And we've got plenty to choose from in our Fair Trade Shop; whether it's purses, clutches, totes, or weekender bags. The artisan co-op, Mayamam Weavers, is a group of women from Guatemala who refuse to leave their home country and families behind to make a living. So they made a way to support themselves and their families while staying in their communities. They weave all of their products by hand on looms using different techniques and tie in their Mayan culture. 

Here's 4 Bags from Guatemala we love and know you will too

1. Weekender Tote Bag in Caramel 

This weekender tote bag is perfect for a day trip or weekend away. Made from sturdy, handwoven cotton with a fabric liner so you know this bag will last you years to come. Also comes in Indigo Blue. 

2. Beach Tote in Stormy Blues and Carousel

If you live near a beach or make it a regular summer vacation, you know a large, sturdy tote bag is a MUST. Handwoven with cotton canvas and lined with waterproof ripstop nylon, this is the perfect bag to hold all your needs for a trip to the beach.

3. Cross Body Bags from Guatemala in Black

Every woman has had that moment in her life where her purse or bag is in her way. Enter the beauty that is cross body bags that allow your hands and shoulders to be free. Made from handwoven cotton with an outside zipper pocket and interior slip pocket. Also, comes in Emerald Green and Cobalt Blue. 

4. Rolltop Backpack in Caramel 

This backpack is made from 100% handwoven cotton both inside and out. It has a wide zippered pocket, side pocket, and fabric liner. The straps are also padded so that you don't get that pinch you experience with most backpacks. It also comes in Indigo Blue. 

Find these and other great bags handwoven from Guatemala in our Fair Trade Shop. 

There's only four days left to order first class mail and receive it by Christmas. 

International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women is November 25, two days after Americans give thanks for a multitude of blessings. Many women in both developed and developing countries will just be giving thanks that they live to see another day. 

The Frequency of Violence Against Women 

Violence against women persists throughout the world and takes on many forms. While many people tend to see it as an issue that only exists in oppressed countries where women aren't viewed as equals, it's a problem that runs rampant even in developed countries like the United States. Oftentimes, it takes the form of domestic violence and sexual assault but it can also be genital mutilation and random attacks in the street. 

The UN reports that in 87 countries from 2005 to 2016, 19 percent of women ages 15 to 49 said they had experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner in the previous 12 months.

This typically translates into 1 in 3 women experiencing violence against them at some point in their lifetime, according to the World Health Organization. That means that if you are a woman and have two female friends, one of you has experienced assault in some form because of your gender. If you're a man and you have three female friends, one of them has experienced someone being physically violent toward them. 

Taking Action 

This is why the UN established days like the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Awareness is key and it can lead to action. That's where we've stepped in to help women in poverty. 

Many of our artisan co-operatives are comprised of women who are sewing and creating products by hand to support themselves and their children. This means they can afford to send their kids to school, buy food for their table, and shoes for their feet. When children are educated, human rights issues such as gender inequality aren't as prominent. The children learn right from wrong, fair from unfair, and how to treat others no matter their gender or skin color. 

In addition to our female artisans, as part of our Renew Bihar program we have created an empowering women program. When the program is fully launched, we will be able to train women on how to develop and create quality products. We'll also show them how to run a business, hire employees, and practice ethical business standards. We will walk alongside them as they slowly build a small business and lift themselves and their families out of poverty. 

Empowering Women 

Here at Jesus' Economy, we are in the business of empowering women. When women are empowered, the cycle of poverty breaks which helps the community in which they live. As a result, more people in the community are able to have access to education. When communities see this increase in education, the violence against women decreases. 

When International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women arrives this Saturday the 25, talk about it with your friends and family, spread awareness, pray about how you can help end violence against women across the globe, and then take action. 

Every choice we make has an impact that ripples out farther. As we fight to alleviate global poverty, we are reminded of the chain that is created when we help just one person.

Through the Empowering Women program in Bihar, India, 40 women will receive business training so they can turn their existing struggling businesses into thriving businesses that sell products internationally.

But it doesn’t stop there. Each of those 40 women has a family. She probably has at least two children. When her business flourishes, she is able to provide for her family. She will be able to afford for her children to go to school. Her children will gain an education, become literate, and have a better future. These children will go on to have kids who will also be able to attend school; and the financial stability ripples onward.

No one action is isolated. If one woman is funded to go through the training program, she lifts her entire family out of poverty, and creates a stable foundation for all her descendants to come.

The training helps the individuals and the families, but also the community. As the financial state of families improves through the success of the businesses, Bihar will also obtain increasing economic strength. When the businesses start selling their products internationally, a door is opened for more money flow in Bihar. Today, the businesses are only selling to local people; money doesn’t leave the villages, and money doesn’t come in. It's essentially trading hands over and over again. But in the future, opportunities for ecommerce will improve the economy on a larger scale, thus helping lift the entire community out of poverty, too.

Ending poverty isn’t an overnight thing. It’s going to take time, but we have to start somewhere. Let’s start with the 40 women and their families.

So far, we have raised $4,685. The entire program costs $23,000. Let’s do the math. If each of the 40 women are supporting two other people, that means 120 people will be directly lifted out of poverty through the program. This means it takes $190 to lift a person out of poverty, or $575 to empower a woman to lift her whole family out of poverty. That’s a small amount of money when you think about the immeasurable impact it will have.

We still need to raise $18,315. If 100 people donated just $10, we’d be $1,000 closer to our goal. Want to help us get there?

By partnering with us, you can empower a woman in Bihar, India to change the cycle of poverty for the future of her family. Be a part of this change and consider giving financially today.

100 percent of your donations go directly to India to support job creation efforts.