Christmas is right around the corner, and we have everything you’ll need from Christmas gifts to decorations. You can choose to shop by artisan, country, or category. Our holiday collection is packed with everything you’ll need for the season, and even better, all the products are beautiful, handcrafted, and ethically made.

Here are a few of our cheerful holiday products:

 

 

Shopping fair trade brings hope to artisans around the world who are working for a better future. And since Christmas is a perfect time to reflect on hope, it’s a perfect time to shop fair trade.

Shop Holiday Collection 

 

 

Just outside Nairobi, Chamtich Kenya is creating jobs for those rising out of extreme poverty situations. This is done through leather and cattle related work. 

Alvin Sang, who leads Chamtich Kenya, is involved in many efforts to help his local people, including working against forced marriage and female genital mutilation. Alvin empowers women through creating sustainable jobs via international and local partnerships. 

Chamtich Kenya and Jesus' Economy Collaborate to Offer Fair Trade Products

Thus Chamtich products are representative of many artisans and entrepreneurs who make various items such as housewares, jewelry, and clothing. Jesus' Economy partners with Chamtich Kenya to further their vision through the purchase of Maasai beaded sandals. More than 20 men and women work to produce these sandals. 

Alvin initiates each project. The materials are then procured by young men in need of work. Other men and women then do the leather working and stitching. Finally, the sandals are handed off to a group of women to handcraft the beadwork on each pair. This results in each and every part of these sandals being handmade.

You can find these sandals for sale at the Fair Trade Shop on Jesus' Economy.

Featured Fair Trade Products by Chamtich Kenya

Spring is finally upon us and for most women that means freeing the feet and busting out the sandals. Why not start this spring season with a brand new pair of sandals that not only look gorgeous and feel comfortable but are a conversation piece about fair trade and empowering women? Chamtich Kenya creates these stunning, genuine leather sandals in two colors and two different bead styles. 

Maasai Black Leather Sandals

Maasai Brown Leather Sandals 

Whether you live where it's warm, or are looking for a gorgeous pair of sandals for your next trip, you will be thrilled to wear these. And when you're asked about them, you will have a great story to tell about how you helped those overcoming poverty through your purchase. 

See more about how Chamtich Kenya creates these sandals in the JesusEconomy.org Fair Trade Shop. 

Shopping fair trade can empower artisans like Alvin to continue to help lift the men and women he works with out of extreme poverty. Join us in helping to alleviate poverty by shopping fair trade. 

This week, get a complimentary five-pack of hand-painted greeting cards from Kenya with a purchase or donation of $40.00 or more. Shop in our fair trade store or donate to our Renew Bihar, India Campaign or our Operations Fund to be eligible. 

This offer expires at 11:59pm on Tuesday, April 19th.

Reverend James Tembula and his team at Light of Hope Global Ministries in Kisumu, Kenya have taken up the call to train local pastors in the Bible. In this interview, Reverend James talks with Kalene Barry, Chief Projects Officer for Jesus' Economy, about the challenges facing indigenous pastors in Kenya. 

Featuring Reverend James A. Tembula, Founder and Director of Light of Hope Global Ministries in Kisumu, Kenya. 

About Light of Hope Global Ministries

Light of Hope Global Ministries provides biblical education conferences, as well as schooling and diploma programs for Kenyan pastors and Christian leaders. They also finance the work of church planting. Due to lack of funds, transportation and other barriers, many Kenyan pastors have little to no biblical education before they begin their pastorship. Get in contact with Reverend James to find out how you can support this gospel work in Kenya. Email him at jatafaith[at]yahoo[dot]com or write to: Light of Hope Global Ministries, P.O. Box 7519, Kisumu 40100, Kenya

 

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On the border between Tanzania and Kenya, a lone ministry is tackling the drastic poverty all around them. Learn about the devastating legacy of Female Genital Mutilation, underaged pregnancies, polygamy, and HIV/AIDS, and how Christ's pull on one man's heart has turned ashes into new life.

 

Featuring Evans Magwe, Director of the Nyabohanse Children's Rescue Centre 

On today's "Live Your Beliefs" podcast, I -- Kalene Barry, Chief Projects Officer for Jesus' Economy -- interview Evans Magwe.

 

About Evans and NCRC

Evans Magwe is the Founder and Director of the Nyabohanse Children Rescue Centre (NCRC) in Isebania, Kenya. NCRC serves poor and underprivileged children, many of whom are orphans lacking food, shelter, clothing, and basic education. Find out more about how you can support NCRC at their website -- $2 a day can help a child in need. 

 

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Sometimes, it’s hard to find ways to be creative in this ever-conforming world.  Everything is mass-produced and looks generally the same. Accessories are becoming neutral and uniform. Do you want a bracelet that is both pretty and allows you to creatively express yourself?

The Porcelain Bead Bracelets from Kenya are just that. These lovely bracelets are made with beads wonderfully fashioned from 100% porcelain. The beads are fragile, but incredibly beautiful, with variant colors painted on their black bases. The dimensions are 2 ¾” in diameter, with the elastic band being able to stretch up to 4”. 

Not Only Wonderfully Handmade, But Also Fair Trade

The beads are not only special in craft, but are also very colorful—allowing for easy pairing with casual or formal attire. It’s not often that you find bracelets that will match nearly any outfit. With so many colors on one band, these bracelets will.

The Porcelain Bead Bracelet is not only pretty and colorful, it is also a fair trade product. It helps provide jobs for people who would otherwise be living in extreme poverty in Kenya.

The Story Behind the Porcelain Bead Bracelet from Kenya

One of the people the Porcelain Bead Bracelet empowers is Anne Nasieku. Anne is a Maasai woman living near Nairobi, Kenya.

At one point, Anne learned that many children in her area were unable to attend pre-school and kindergarten due to the costs involved. Many of these children’s mothers were also HIV positive, and thus could not maintain sustainable incomes. Desiring to make a difference, Anne started a program called “Mayiant” which means “blessings.” This program allows women to earn an income by creating beads for the products Anne sells—including these delicate porcelain bracelets.

The artisans who made these bracelets now have employment, and equally great, they have a hope that things can change. The work of Jesus’ Economy’s partner, Tembo Trading Education Project—who initiated getting these bracelets to an international market—has made all this possible.

Express your creativity and be a part of helping women in Kenya work for sustainable incomes. Imagine having a bracelet that is a beautiful piece of art, easy to wear, and is offering hope to impoverished women in Kenya. Buy a Porcelain Bead Bracelet today—for yourself or a friend.

This week, we're giving a free handmade bracelet from Kenya to one lucky winner! If you want in on this, sign up for our newsletter or get in touch with us about being an advocate.

 

 

For all of you who already signed up for our newsletter, or who are advocates, thanks for your support—you already have a shot at getting a free product. Each week, we will announce the winner by Tuesday morning at 6am PST. (You will have until Friday at 10am PST to enter each week, but to be entered for all four weeks, you only have to sign up once or become an advocate.)

 

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Gratitude Month's Backstory

Handmade bracelet from KenyaWe are overwhelmed with gratitude each time one of you advocates for Jesus' Economygives to one of our causes, or makes a fair trade purchase from us. To show you how much we love you, we're dedicating a month to gratitude. From the weeks of May 20th to June 10th, we will be giving away a free fair trade product each week to one lucky winner! Our first giveaway was two weeks ago and last week we gave away two Hope Art handmade bracelets from Zambia.

Each week of Gratitude Month will be focused on a featured fair trade product that we will be giving away to one lucky winner; we will also tell you the story behind the product.

Stay tuned for Thursday's blog post, when we will tell you the story behind the handmade porcelain bracelet from Kenya.

Want in on the Giveaway for This Handmade Bracelet from Kenya?

Again, if you want in on the giveaway, just sign up for our newsletter or get in touch with us about being an advocate.

Thanks for helping make the world a better place! We love you all and cannot express enough how much we appreciate you.

 

So many times in life we don’t know how seemingly ordinary events and small decisions will change our future. Here is one such story—it will make you think twice about your next decision.

Downtown Nakuru, Kenya, 2004. Debra Akre, cofounder of Tembo Trading Education Project, is approached by an artist trying to sell her greeting cards. Debra agrees to buy some, but on her way to to get money to pay the artist, another artist named Peter Maina stops her. Peter tells Debra she is being overcharged for the cards. Due to his honesty, Debra decides to buy cards from Peter instead—and that is how a decade long friendship and business arrangement began.

A Win-Win-Win-Win: Yes, That’s Possible

See our fair trade greeting cardsToday, Tembo purchases cards from Peter regularly and sells them to people like us here at Jesus’ Economy, so that we can distribute them around the world to people like you via our fair trade shop. This is a win-win-win-win. Peter’s cards are purchased—providing for him and his family—and his work is distributed internationally. Tembo makes a profit when we purchase from them, allowing for them to reinvest that money into education in Kenya—their primary mission. Then, when you make a purchase from Jesus’ Economy, we reinvest any profit on our end, in microloans, church grants, meeting needs, and a little into our ongoing administrative costs. And you get beautiful, handmade greeting cards that you can give to friends and family members.

The Beginning of Peter's Handmade Greeting Cards

As Debra got to know Peter better, she heard his story. It was also a seemingly insignificant event that led Peter to his career. A younger Peter heard a Ugandan artist—who was visiting—tell him and his fellow students about his art and his work. Once Peter expressed interest, the Ugandan artist took Peter under his wing and taught him how to paint. Peter then became an entrepreneur, selling his work to others.

Expanding the Efforts of an Artist

In addition to helping Peter’s work reach an international market, Tembo Trading Education Project has helped Peter get commissioned for other work. Peter created Tembo’s logo and the cover of the book that tells their story, Beneath the Baobab Tree: Where Poverty Dies and Hope Begins. Peter has also painted murals and other larger works.

Fair Trade Can Transform Lives

Fair trade can transform lives, as Peter’s story so well illustrates. And it’s the small decisions sometimes that can lead to life transformation. What if Peter had not decided to tell the white lady visiting his city the fair price for work like his?

Follow where God leads you today—speak the truth, speak honestly, and speak up. You never know where it might lead.

Get your handmade greeting cards in our fair trade shop. You will receive something incredible in return—cards so beautiful your friends and family will want to frame them. But just so you know, you wouldn't be the first customer who decided to frame them.