The Justice of Fair Trade in Ending Human Trafficking

Today is the World Day against Trafficking in Persons, a day dedicated to renewing the fight against human trafficking. Research estimates that about 25 million people are currently enslaved for either labor or sexual exploitation.

While many factors influence human trafficking, and the fight to end it requires difficult, impassioned work, one of the biggest things we can do to work against and prevent human trafficking is to fight against poverty. Most of the people who are trafficked come from impoverished communities, and this makes trafficking harder to stop because of a lack of resources, attention, and power. People with less financial stability are easier to exploit, and the trafficking industry has taken this into account.

Most of us are not human rights lawyers, and we aren’t in politics or law enforcement. Ending human trafficking isn’t something we can directly instigate. But fighting poverty, for most of us, is easy and we should be doing all we can to help lift our brothers and sisters around the world into more hopeful circumstances.

What Can We Do to End Poverty?

We can combat poverty in a lot of small ways as we go about our day, but one of the simplest things we can do is to shop responsibly through organizations we trust. We all have things we need to live, and we all have things we want, and every one of these items can be bought ethically if we take the time to look.

If you’re looking for an organization that promotes fair trade, take a look at our Fair Trade Shop. Jesus’ Economy is fighting poverty around the world through our partnerships with many fair trade artisan groups, through our project to Renew Bihar, India, and you can join us to make a change.

How Fair Trade Fights Poverty and Prevents Human Trafficking

Fair trade is amazing and here are just a few reasons why:

  • It’s ethical. Fair trade ensures that certain requirements are met when it comes to working conditions and how much is paid to the artisan for their products. 
  • It’s good for the environment. Most materials used to make fair trade goods are recycled or made from renewable and sustainable resources. 
  • It’s good for the economy. Fair trade helps boost income and takes the money from just exchanging hands in the village to expanding into a larger market. 

But the most important thing is that fair trade improves lives around the world.

When artisans are able to make and sell their products for a fair wage, they have a better chance of providing for themselves and their futures. Fair trade artisans are able to lift themselves out of poverty, which lowers their risk of being involved in trafficking. They are empowered to resist a cycle of fear and begin a cycle of hope.

Human trafficking is a complex evil, and buying fair trade will not eliminate it. But we can do something to fight against it, and if we can do something, we should. We should be compassionate and use our resources and privileges to promote justice.  

“Wash yourselves; make yourselves clean; remove the evil of your deeds from before my eyes; cease to do evil, learn to do good; seek justice, correct oppression; bring justice to the fatherless, plead the widow's cause” (Isaiah 1:16-17, ESV).

Our God is a God of justice, and human trafficking is severely unjust. As believers searching out God’s will, let us seek justice for those oppressed by human trafficking in any way we can.




Charlotte Van Werven
Charlotte Van Werven

Author

Apprentice in Writing and Editorial for Jesus' Economy



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